David DESMARETS

Male Abt 1620 - Abt 1697  (~ 77 years)


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  • Name David DESMARETS  [1
    Born Abt 1620  Prob Beauchamps, Picardie, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    _UID 3AB5D554DC374891A211BD658D61F50DC9F7 
    Died Abt 30 Jul 1697  New Milford, Bergen Co, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried French Burying G, New Milford, Bergen Co, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I16836  Clan Home Genealogy
    Last Modified 24 Aug 2003 

    Father Jean DESMARETS,   b. Abt 1592,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Margrieta DEHERVILLE,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married Prob Beauchamps, Picardie, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Family ID F6188  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Marie SOHIER,   b. Nieppe, Hainault, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1681, New Milford, Bergen Co, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 24 Jul 1643  Walloon Church A, Walcheren Island, Zeeland, Holland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Jean DEMAREST,   b. Abt 14 Apr 1645, Middleburg, Walcheren Island, Zeeland, Holland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Oct 1719  (Age ~ 74 years)
     2. Marie DEMAREST,   b. Abt 21 Oct 1646, Middleburg, Walcheren Island, Zeeland, Holland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. David DEMAREST,   b. Abt 22 Jun 1649, Middleburg, Walcheren Island, Zeeland, Holland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. David DEMAREST,   b. 20 Dec 1651, Mannheim, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt Aug 1691  (Age 39 years)
     5. Samuel DEMAREST,   b. 5 Aug 1656, Mannheim, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1728  (Age 71 years)
     6. Marie DEMAREST,   b. 27 Mar 1659, Mannheim, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Marie DEMAREST,   b. 17 May 1662, Mannhiem, Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. Daniel DEMAREST,   b. Abt 7 Jul 1666, New Harlem, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jan 1672, New Harlem, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 5 years)
    Last Modified 24 Aug 2003 
    Family ID F6187  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1620 - Prob Beauchamps, Picardie, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Abt 30 Jul 1697 - New Milford, Bergen Co, NJ Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - French Burying G, New Milford, Bergen Co, NJ Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • !BIRTH: "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      !DEATH: "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      LVG: Huguenot Village on Staten Island; New Harlem, NY in 1665

      LVG: Kinderkamack (now New Milford), Bergen Co, NJ; home is now part of the BCHS

      OCCU: Magistrate of Staten Island; Overseer, Constable, Schepen in New Harlem, NY

      !BURIAL: "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      EMIG:
      DATE ABT. 16 Apr 1663
      PLAC came from Amsterdam, Holland on the ship "Bontekoe" (the Spotted Cow) SOUR "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      WILL: (dated); proved 30 Jul 1697

      RELI: joined the New York Reformed Dutch Church (at the Fort), NY

      _FA2:
      DATE 1682
      PLAC founder of the French Church, Kinderkamack (now New Milford), Bergen Co, NJ SOUR "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      _FA3:
      DATE 1652
      PLAC Elder of the French Church at Mannheim, Palatinate, Germany SOUR "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      _FA4:
      DATE Feb 1676/77
      PLAC acquired land in New Harlem, NY (two "garden lots" west of the village) SOUR "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      According to "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964:

      "David with his parents was forced to flee from France because of their Protestant religion. They moved, in 1642, to Middleburg, on the island of Walcheren off the west coast of Holland, where they joined a colony of Belgian and French refugees."

      "...on 1 May 1678 the entire family removed to their new home on the Hackensack, then called the Herring River. David Sr. was in his 58th year; his eldest son Jean had just reached the age of 33 and had been married ten years to Jacomina deRuine, daughter of one of the earliest settlers in Harlem, and had four children. David Jr., aged 28 years, had not been married for three years to Rachel Cresson, and had one child living. Samuel, not yet 22 years old, was unmarried, but he returned to Harlem in a few months and took back with him Marie, the 16 year old half-sister of Jacomina deRuine, whom he married in the Bergen Church (Jersey City). Although Marie Sohier was living when the family left New York, she survived only a short time and is said to have died of small pox. She at the time was a member of the Reformed Church at Bergen. She probably was the first person buried in what came to be known as the French Burying Ground.

      On 7 Oct 1678, David desMarets Sr., his wife Marie, sons Jean, David Jr. and wife, and Samuel united with the Bergen Curch (now Jersey City), by certificate.
      Jacque Laroe also became a member on the same day.

      Between 1686 and 1689 he removed to the west side of the Hackensack where a saw mill and larger grist mill, called the Great Mill, were built.

      ...the first meeting in [the French Church of Kinderkamack] was held in 1682...It was built on land belonging to the DesMarets family, directly to the east of their dwelling, adjoining the little French Cemetery which remains today...services were held here until 1696, conducted by Reverend Pierre Daille, a minister at the French Church in New York...A Dutch Reformed Church, known as the 'Church on the Green' was being organized at Hackensack, a short distance to the south. The French Church at kinderkamack joined with this congregation and memberships were transferred there. The Hackensack Church records contain the following entries:

      5 Apr 1696 came to us with letters from the French Church the following: David Demaree
      Son Jan with his wife Merretje Jacobse VanWinkle
      May DeMaree wife of Jacobus Sloth (She was Jan's Daughter).
      Jan Dury (Durie) and his wife Rachel Iverson (This was Rachel Cresson, widow of David Jr., and her 2nd husband)
      David, son of David, also from New York (Son of David Jr.)

      On the 4th October came with letters:
      Mary Dorwyn (deRuine) Samuel's wife.
      Magdalena DeMaree, daughter of Samuel

      The famous Demarest heart stone bearing the date 1696 and the initials D.M.R. was placed in the east wall of the new church.

      The family coat-of-arms is beside the altar in the French Church of St. Esprit in New York which organization is a continuation of the first French Church in New Amsterdam, to which the family belonged. There also is a commemorative tablet to the family in the Huguenot Church in Charleston, S.C."

      The Huguenot Church at Huguenot Park on Staten Island has a plaque in memory of David desMarets, with the insciption: "In memory of David Demarest, Staten Island 1663, Harlem 1665, The Hackensack 1667, Delegate from Staten Island to the Provincial Assembly of New Netherland 1664, Founder of the Huguenot Colony on the Hackensack." ________________________________________________________________________________
      _____

      According to "Some Lesser-Known Huguenots on the Hackensack" by Howard I. Durie (found in the Bergen County History 1971 Annual):

      Earlier stays by the Demarest family at Staten Island and New Harlem proved unsatisfactory. After trouble over the payment of taxes for the support of the Dutch Church at the latter place, David Demarest, Senior, decided to make a new start where a more independent existance would be guaranteed.

      The land then available in Bergen County in Easy Jersey, at what seemed a long disatnce from religious and govenmental dictation, was an attraction and Demarest negotiated for the purchase of an area large enough to accomodate the number of French Huguenot families he anticipated would be interested in such a settlement. A few families were ready to go with him at that time.

      After coming to terms witht he Indian owners and arranging for the payment oft he agreed consideration, a Warranty Deed was signed on June 8, 1677...for a tract of land for their proposed 'French Colony,' described as follows:

      'A tract of land lying and being uppon Hakinsack River, Bounded on the West by the said River, North by a creek called Kessay Waky, on the East by a great mountaine standing betwene a great swamp and Hudson's River, and South by the land of Laurence Andrissen, running in length from a small brook of Run at the North end of the said Laurences land called Hesawakey, to a certaine creek or River betwene thirty and forty foot broade called Kesewakey Northerly, and running Easterly in bredth from the said River of Hackinsack to the end of the Greate Swamp that joynes to the great mountaine aforsaid, out of which said swamp there runs two creeks or brooks, the one extending itself southerly by the back side of Hackinsack, and the other brook being betwene thirty and forty foot broade called Gessewakin extending and running about Northerly into Hackinsack River, which two creeks does incompass the aforesaid tract of land, on that part of itt.'

      ...the tract was inteded to have as natural boundaries (aside from teh Hackensack River on the west), the Dwars Kill on the north, the Tenakill on the north and east, and a small brook along the Van Buskirk land at New Bridge, partly on the south...today this expanse includes all the municipalities of New Milford, Bergenfield, Dumont, haworth; and parts of Tenafly, Cresskill, Demrest, Oradell and Closter.

      ...Demarest's purchase was contingent upon his settling between thirty and forty families upon it and that he required a confirmatory patent from East Jersey. The settlement endeavor was not only unsuccessful, but the land turned out to be burdened with the claims of previous patentees...

      ...the proprietors...refused to grant title to Demarest when the influx of Huguenots was not forthcoming, and when the large amount of land covered in the Indian Deed was much more than the few families at hand would have required. Instead they did grant patents for certain portions along the east side of the river commensurate with the needs of those in possession, or ready to take possession.

      By 1681...a mill was in existence on the east side of the river at a place called Old Bridge (New Milford), in which year a number of tracts were surveyed ...for David Demarest, Senoir, (470 acres together with 24 acres on the west side of the river); David Demarest, junior, (186 acres); John Demarest (236 acres); Samuel Demarest (176 acres); and Nicholas deVeau (80 acres)...these ran from New Bridge north, and were then or later known as the First Allotment, bounded on the east by the "barren land," also called the Patent Line, now marked by the route of Prospect Avenue in Dumont and Bergenfield." ________________________________________________________________________________
      _____

      According to "Bergen Records, 1666-1788," edited by Dingman Versteeg and Thomas E. Vermilye, Jr., 1976:

      The following people joined the Bergen Reformed Dutch Church by certificate in 1678:

      David De Mareets, Dismissed
      Marie Joorier, Deceased
      Jean De Mareets
      Jacomyntie Drywen , "
      David De Mareets - the younger
      Rachel Creisson
      Samuel De Mareets
      Jacob Lareu ________________________________________________________________________________
      _____

      According to "The Durie Family: Jean Durier of the Huguenot Colony in Bergen County New Jersey and Some of His Duree, DuRee, Durie, DuRie and Duryea Descendants," compiled by Howard I. Durie, 1985:

      [The French Church at Kinderkamack] was initiated with the sponsorship and support of the French Church at New York of which it became an "outstation." The Reverend Pierre Daille was the spiritual leader and main guiding factor during its exestence. The local church had been one of the goals of David Demarest, Senior, for his Huguenot Colony, and now became a reality. A Consistory was elected at this time comprised of the leaders among the membership, for the handling of church affairs. The pastor from New York came at intervals to preach and conduct the rites of marriage and baptism, and services were held in homes or barns, depending on the season of the year. With or without the attendance of a pastor, services were also held each Sabbath, conducted by one fo the elders, or a person similar to the vooleser and schoolmaster in the Dutch congregations.

      The theory about an actual local church building has survived solely on tradition, and whether a building ever existed is still a moot question. The fact that the rites of marriage and baptism no longer took place at Bergen does not imply a local church building was in existence as early as 1682 or even later; only that the congregation was now associated with the French Church in New York whose visiting pastor handled these matters and also preached on occasion. Notwithstanding the very scant remains of foundation walls nad piers of a building, found during an excavation near the French cemetery by the Works Progress Administration in past years, no factual proof remains to show that this was surviving evidence of a church building. There are too many procatical reasons to the contrary The claim of tradition seems to rest solely on the figurative image of a church building which automatically comes to mind when the congregation, itself, is mentioned.

      The French cemetery, near where the alleged church site was excavated, existed from the earliest days of the Huguenot settlement. Marie Sohier, wife of David Demarest, Senior, died sometime after 3 Oct 1681 when she was a sponsor at the baptism of a namesakegranddaughter at the Bergen Church, and prior to the termination of the famiy memebership there in 1682, her name being marked "deceased" alongside the entry of 7 Oct 1678. According to tradition she was buried on a knoll near the Hackensack River about three-quarters' of a mile south of the early mill site and settlement later called "Old Bridge." This was within the area along the east side of the river where the first warrants of surveys had been authorized by the Proprietors in Jul 1681, to which the Demarests expected the proper patents to affirm their Indian title of 1677. They had settled on part of the Indian purchase near the river and were living in some type of temporary housing. The warrants covered tracts extending from the river easterly as far as the present Prospect Avenue, later the westerly boundary line of 2010 acres for which David Demarest, Senior, received a deed 27 Jul 1686. This boundary was later referred to as the division line between the first and second allotments of the tracts bordered by the river on the west and those bordered by the Tenakill brook on the east. The warrants, however, were subsequently replaced by further warrants made 3 Aug 1693 for a series of tracts having the same length east and west, but distinctly different in width north and south. By that time, however, the order directed to the Surveyor-General stated that the shares of land were "where thay are now settled," and they had apparently requested a revision in the quantity of each share. The death of David Demarest, Senior, in September or October 1693, shortly after the second series of surveys, may have interrupted or a time the transactions with the Proprietors. Deeds were finally executed for these shares in 1696. Not only were the Demarests frustrated by these delays, but had to settle outstanding, albeit voided, claims of the Nicholls and Bollen heirs for previos grants made in 1669 for much of the Indian title.

      The cemetery and alleged church sites finally came to be located on the southwesterly part of a tract containing 200 acres of land conveyed by the Proprietors of East New Jersey to Samuel Demarest by deed 30 Jan 1696. This had been the land previously surveyed for David Demarest, Junior, in 1681.

      !MARRIAGE: "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964

      MARRIAGE: According to "The Demarest Family," Demarest Family Association, 1964:

      Their marriage record from the Walloon Church at Middleburg, Walcheren Island, Zeeland, Holland reads, "1643, 4 Juillet, Assiste de Jean Marets et Francois Sohier, Marguerite deHerville et Marguerite Sohier; David desMarets, fils de Jean, natif de Beauchamps et Marie Sohier, fille de Francois, natif de Nieppe, et le 19 Juillet. Marie le 29 juliet." [1]

  • Sources 
    1. [S299] Daniel Clark Smith Gedcom, Daniel Clark Smith (Reliability: 2).